NYC Easter Parade and Bonnet Festival

When is a parade not a parade? When you think of a parade what usually comes to mind is people marching in groups on a planned route with floats and bands playing. The New York City Easter Parade and Bonnet Festival does not fit into that definition.

The Easter parade is more of a mingle. Fifth Avenue between 49th and 57th Streets becomes filled with not only parade participants, but also spectators. The participants wearing bonnets amble this way and that stopping for long stretches to pose for selfies with spectators and photographs. Spectators have short conversations with participants about their bonnets and where they are from.

Ladies from the Milliner’s Guild

It is not just locals who participate, but tourists from around the world join in. I met a group of women from Australia, I believe they said they were from Brisbane. There was a family group from Norway that also joined in. Some people even bring their canines with hats. You will see all ages participating, young children through seniors.

Part of the group from Norway?
Ladies from Australia
Attire

One can see a variety of bonnets during this parade. Some fall under traditional Sunday best hats, while other bonnets were constructed with a hot glue gun or even screws. You will see many spring or Easter themed bonnets, but not all fall under those categories.

If you plan to visit New York City during the Easter holidays join in or be a spectator to this long held NYC tradition. Just head to 5th Avenue near St. Patrick’s on Easter morning. It’s an Easter treat!

NYPD cop wanted a selfie.

Just Like Dad

I am posting just a few more eagle pictures. These were taken today. Two babies are in the nest. Soon it will be hard to see the nest as the trees are starting to bud. The nest is along the Hudson River in New York.

This one seems to be copying dad.
Family portrait

Little fish for little eagles

Eagles in New York

One of the most recognized symbols of America is the bald eagle. They are in every state except Hawaii according to the DEC-NY. A few decades ago they were on the brink of extiction in New York state. Today they are making a resurgence.

Eagle Population

Eagles were previously on the endangered species list. The population of eagles suffered a major decline starting in the 1960s. Eagles were affected by DDT and other pesticides and pollutants. These chemicals were passed along the food chain. As a result, the eggshells of the eagles were weakened, so the babies did not survive.

In 1976 there was only one pair of nesting eagles in New York state. Efforts were put in place to curb pollution and protect eagle habitats. After DDT was banned, eagles were producing young in greater numbers. By 2010 there were 173 breeding pairs of eagles in New York and now eagles have been moved to the threatened species list.

Eagle fortifying the nest along the Hudson River the day after a storm.
When to See Eagles

The best time I found to see eagles, at least in the Hudson Valley, is between February and April. Earlier during that time period you may see them mate. During that time period they also sit on eggs so you may see the father bring a fish up to the mother. After the egg or eggs hatch, you will see them bring more fish up to the nest to feed the young eagles. It is harder to view them once the leaves grow on the trees, as your view of them will be obscured.

A pair of eagles during mating time.
Where to See Eagles

Since eagles mainly eat fish their nests are usually close to bodies of water, such as rivers and lakes. There are nests along the Hudson and Delaware Rivers as well as other bodies of water in the state.

See these websites to find some eagle viewing locations:

https://www.wideopenspaces.com/best-places-see-bald-eagles-new-york/

Special Content One

These only list a few good locations to view them as others may be on private property or in places where locals may not want hoards of people showing up to view them.

Hanging with dad in the nest.

These majestic birds are enjoyable to view from a distance. Curbing pollution reaps rewards for humans and for those in the animal kingdom.

NYIP Portfolio

NY Cow with a NY attitude at Stony Kill Farm
A hawk looking for lunch
Pick Your Own Apples at Minard’s Family Farm in the Hudson Valley
This sheep wanted to communicate with us.
Parade to mark Sinterklaas in Rhinebeck, NY
A Chinelos dance from Morelos, Mexico as performed in Rhinebeck at Sinterklaas
Nachos from Crossroads Brewing Company in Athens, NY
First Walk on January 1st on the Walkway Over the Hudson
Snowboarding at Otis Ridge
Eagle working on fortifying its nest near the Hudson River in Dutchess County, NY