Loon Lake

There is more than one Loon Lake in New York. One is north of the Saranac Lake/ Lake Placid area, but does not have public access. The second Loon Lake, which I visited, is in Warren County northwest of Lake George and it has public access.

How to Get There

You can get to Loon Lake by taking 87, the Adirondack Northway north from Lake George. Take the exit for Chestertown/Highway 8. Travel west past Chestertown. There are two access points on the southern end of the lake. The first one charges a fee, but it also has a free boat wash you can use without paying to put your kayak in. The second location is very closeby. This location is a town recreation area with a beach and parking right along highway 8.

This is the boat launch that charges a fee.

Loon Lake is 525 acres in size. The length of the shoreline is just under 12 miles. It has many houses on the southern end. I was told many of these are summer homes or rentals. The majority of houses have dock and motorboats.

There was more activity on this lake than I am used to, but I will say the boaters kept a safe distance from this kayaker. People were very friendly on and off the lake.

I could hear thunder the entire time I was on the lake, so I may have done less than half the lake. The thunder was in the distance, but always think of safety first.
The dogs seemed to enjoy riding on a stand up paddleboard.
This man zoned back and forth on the lake on a hoverboard.
Arriving back at the beach. The beach is next to highway 8. The parking is right next to the road.

Overall I would say this is a nice place to paddle. It is not as busy as Lake George, but you are not totally isolated. There are also several other lakes within a short drive of this lake. If you want to paddle a lake in an areas with a friendly, small town feel go to Loon Lake in Warren County, New York. It is another great Adirondack paddle.

8 thoughts on “Loon Lake”

  1. That looks amazing! A few years back I lived in Burrville, CT, renting a condo right next to little Burr Pond State Park (a mere 88 acres). I bought my first kayak, and spent many happy hours paddling around there. I can just imagine how lovely this Loon Lake must be, and your pictures certainly help!

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      1. I hope to get back up to that area sometime. The scenery is spectacular, especially in the fall. Those dam 🦫s are pretty cute though, despite causing such mischief. 😉

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  2. Beautiful place On Sunday, July 4, 2021, Sharon’s Iconic Travel Photography Blog wrote:

    > sharonsiconictravelphotographyblog posted: ” There is more than one Loon > Lake in New York. One is north of the Saranac Lake/ Lake Placid area, but > does not have public access. The second Loon Lake, which I visited, is in > Warren County northwest of Lake George and it has public access. How ” >

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Motorboats on the lakes are their ruination. The noise, the wake, the all-around pollution. It’s good that these boaters were respectful but motorboats on lakes – except for emergencies – are anathema.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I personally prefer lakes without them or bodies of water who limit it to small electric motors which only enable the boat to go slow. I have been on a very large pond with a boat with an electric motor and you could not even hear it. I did not see any loons on this lake oddly as that is it’s name. The amount of boats could be the reason if there is none. I have been on lakes where boaters will not pay attention to who else is on the lake- canoes and kayaks. They actually will come dangerously close. I avoid any lake I feel unsafe on. One in particular I heard had a boater run over and kill a kayaker. Being respectful goes a long way with me. I would return to this lake. Many places in the Adirondacks are in the Adirondack Park which includes land deemed wilderness and forever wildlife. Many of the lakes and ponds I go to have at least partial land around the water in the park. So there is only development on non park lands.

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      1. My experience is far more limited than yours but the noise from the motorboats makes lake life unpleasant (to me). In thinking about a vacation, I know that a place on the lake – sounds so great – will be spoiled because of the motorboats and jetskis. And yes loons seem to be a rarity on lakes where the noise (motorboats) are allowed. Elk Lake is – or was – an exception to all this.

        And seeing and hearing the loons…that is Adirondak life!

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