Eagles: We Just Want to Play

Do eagles play? Do they try to have fun? I went down early to the Hudson River in New York to watch the young eagles this morning and it appears they do play and enjoy hanging out together.

When I first arrived, the two babies born this spring were on the playground. I think they wanted to enjoy the swings and other equipment to perch on before the children arrived. Maybe they were wondering what all the hype was about in regards to the equipment.

This one perched for a while on a wooden guard rail on the edge of a road. People walking a dog were startled to see it there. The young eagle was not phased by the large dog. He never moved.

Besides flying around they landed on different trees again. In addition, they many times joined each other in their perching spots. They also spent time chasing each other in the air. Unfortunately the lighting on the shots where they are chasing each other around was not very good, so I am leaving them out.

Them seem to join each other a lot. It looks like they are having a conversation.
Team effort- calling out for their parents to bring food most likely. This tree is closer to the river.

I would conclude they do like to play. What do you think? Regardless, I am enjoying the new spots they choose to perch on near the Hudson River.

Baby Eagles Fledge

By Wednesday this past week, both baby eagles were flying. The one that was still branching last weekend was very clumsy. Now both are more confident.

Sitting on the roof of a pavilion.

Today the weather was not very good for photographing wildlife, however, the baby eagles put on a show. They flew from tree to tree and down to the river and back. I loved the trees the picked to land in. I wish their parents would land in the same ones as they were more visible.

This bird, an Oriole? was not too happy about where this eagle planted himself. I think he was not far from its nest. The bird kept singing and flying around him like a gnat.
Stretching his wings occassionally
Hey I was here first! We can’t both be here.
One parent bringing in a fish. Like last week, they young eagles screeched a lot before a fish was brought up around the same time- 11:00. I was there again from around 8-11 or shortly thereafter.

The parents are still bringing fish up to the nest, but now the baby eagles fly back there when they see one parent returning.

I wish the weather would have been better. It was fun to watch these two nonetheless.

Eagle Branching

Fledging is when a bird takes its first flight from the nest. Young eagles typically stay in the nest approximately 10 to 12 weeks. The stage before that is branching. This is when they go between branches of the tree.

On my last post about the eagles you saw the baby eagles in a nest near the Hudson River in New York with the downy, grayish feathers. Now the young eagle has juvenile feathers.

The two babies with their downy, gray feathers. This one was taken a few months ago.

This nest had two baby eagles. Now I see only one. I no longer have a view from above or on level due to the leaves on the trees. The babies a few months ago were exercising their wings by moving them about.

Here is one of the same young eagles a branch below the nest. At this point it is likely full grown. My they grown fast!

On Saturday I saw the young eagle sitting on one branch below the nest the whole time I was there. He seemed like he was unsure of himself or in a pickle. He moved slowly up back and forth on the branch and screeched a lot. Not sure if he was hungry or needed help.

Juvenile feathers

The next day the young eagle was practicing take-offs and landings on neighboring branches and the nest. He seemed quite clumsy as sticks flew off the nest when he landed there.

The eagle here was practicing take-offs and landings between the branches and the nest. I wonder if this one will have fledged by next weekend.

The parents were hardly seen. I did not see them on Saturday. I was only there about 2 hours. A few months ago I could catch the parents feeding the two babies a few times after 8 in the morning. This time, however, I did not see the parents on Sunday between 8-11 a.m. The young eagle was screeching constantly and at one point sounded hurt or desperate when finally the parents flew up one by one to drop off a small fish. The young eagle ate ravenously. I understand the parents may start to withhold food or tempt the young eagle to fly by holding a fish on a neighboring tree.

The eagle is here eating a fish one of the parents dropped off. The lighting is hard with the shadows cast by the branches.

Where is the other young eagle? Has it already fledged? Could it already be out and about enjoying its new ability to fly? Wouldn’t you like to have that bird’s eye view of the Hudson Valley?

Temple Art

Is it a lion or a dragon? I think it may be a dragon. I looked online and could not find a similar image.

I took this image several years ago when in the Pusan/Busan area of South Korea at one of its lovely Buddhist temples. It was taken on an old Pentax K-1000 as slide film. I recently scanned this image.

Buddhist temples are known for their artwork. Besides statues of Buddha, the temples are like an art museum on the inside and outside. If in Korea or another Asian country, be sure to stop by one. You won’t regret it.

Traditional vs. New

Many cultures have traditional clothing or dress. People may wear it during a cultural event, holiday or other special occasion, or during a dance.

Traditional clothing in Korea is called hanbok. For men it is the top and pants you see this man wearing. It can be a dress for women. Many times special shoes are worn with a hanbok like the man above is wearing.

The above picture was taken several years ago in the Pusan/Busan area outside a McDonalds. I took it with an old Pentax K-1000 as slide film. I recently scanned the slide.

I was standing outside McDonalds when this gentleman came walking up carrying a piece of cardboard. I wasn’t sure why he was carrying the cardboard, but soon found out the purpose. He used it to sit on. He looked tired. I am not sure how far away he hiked from. The man decided to sit next to Ronald McDonald. I thought it was a nice contrast. Someone in traditional clothes next to a comical figure. Serious vs. not so serious. I imagined this man’s wife told him before he left home not to get his nice hanbok dirty, so he took the cardboard with him to sit on. I would have to say this was one of my favorite images that I took in Korea.

I love seeing different traditional dress. Does your culture have traditional clothes you wear for special occasions?

Walkway Over the Hudson

Where is the longest pedestrian only footbridge in the world? Are you thinking in the Andes or the Alps? Actually it is in New York State and its called The Walkway Over the Hudson.

The Walkway Over the Hudson was built as a railroad bridge in the 1800s. It is 1.28 miles long, 212 feet above the river, and it connects Highland to Poughkeepsie. It was abandoned in 1974 after a fire. Work was done on it and it reopened in 2009 as a state park that is free to enjoy.

Poughkeepsie Side
View from the Poughkeepsie end – Poughkeepsie and the Mid Hudson Bridge
Near the middle looking at the Highland side

The Walkway isn’t just for walking. People can cross on bike, jog, and bring their dog. It is wheelchair accessible on booth ends.

While there continue your hike. On the Poughkeepsie side of the bridge it connects with the Dutchess Rail Trail. This is a 13 mile rail trail running from the Walkway to Hopewell Junction Train Depot. It is paved the whole way with wide shoulders that are gravel or sand. Bicyclists may prefer riding on the paved area of the trail while runners may prefer jogging on the unpaved shoulder.

The Walkway hosts different events. On January 1st they host First Walk- an organized first hike of the year. Other state parks have similar events.

First Walk on January 1st
First Walk- Not sure why, but I hear donkeys are part of the tradition at the start.

During Memorial Day weekend they are open late one night and have luminaries lining the bridge in honor of those who died in the service of their country. It is a fund raiser for veteran’s groups and people can sponsor luminaries. On July 4th they charge admission to watch the fireworks from the Walkway. The money helps sponsor the fireworks and upkeep of the Walkway.

A pipe band from Staatsburg, N.Y. performed as veterans crossed the bridge on the Highland side.
Pausing to reflect and remember
People could write personal remembrances of loved ones.
The Hudson River below
Hours and Days

They are open all year. A regular hiker told me they plow after snowfall, so don’t let a recent snowstorm hinder you if you enjoy winter strolls. They normally close at sunset, but are open late for special events. They also put up on the announcement board the temperature of the concrete in warmer weather so you know when to avoid bringing your canine hiking buddy.

Concessions and Restrooms

There are food carts and restrooms on both ends of the bridge. If you go early and the food carts are not open there are businesses nearby that sell food. Food carts may not be open during morning hours. As of now there are vendors selling bottled drinks, Italian ice, ice cream and kettle corn.

Getting There

If you are traveling from New York City by train take the Hudson Line and get off at the Poughkeepsie stop. Follow the directions on the Walkway’s website to get to the entrance. If you are traveling by car it may be easier to park on the Highland side. The turn off Route 9W is north of the Poughkeepsie Bridge.

For more information go their website at: https://walkway.org

Do you want a scenic hike? Do you want to have stunning views of the river? Make the journey to the Walkway Over the Hudson.

Farmer’s Dance

Many cultures have dances that are traditional. Mexico has the Jarabe Tapatio, known as the Mexican Hat Dance. Italy is famous for the Tarantella. In Korea they have a dance that dates back 2,500 years called the Farmer’s Dance.

The Farmer’s Dance originated long ago for a purpose. It is performed during agricultural events including planting and harvesting of crops. It was performed to encourage the farmers by giving them a beat to work to.

The music is fast paced and the dancers perform acrobatic movements. They twirl long paper streamers attached to their hats. They wear colorful clothing.

All images on this post were taken years ago on an old Pentax K1000 as slide film. I scanned them from the slides.

While I witnessing this I thought the dancers possessed impressive skills that must have been honed with much practice.

These ladies joined in the festivities.

What kind of dances are traditional to your culture? What was the purpose or meaning behind them? Dance is more than just a performance art.

Fishermen’s Buddha

In the Catholic tradition there are saints for different causes. St. Erasmus or St. Elmo is the patron saint of Sailors. St. Francis of Assisi is the patron saint of Animals. What do they have in Buddhism?

In Buddhism it appears they have different Buddhist shrines focusing on different causes. This was taken a while ago when I worked in Asia. This was a Buddhist Temple in the Pusan/Busan area. I was told by a Korean who went with us that the photo below was the Fishermen’s Buddha and that the women there were praying for the safe return of their husbands and a good catch. The top photo may be from the same temple or from another Buddhist temple focusing on fertility in the same area.

The two images I used on this post were taken several years ago on an old Pentax K-1000 as slide film. I tried to scan them recently.

I find it interesting to see the traditions in other cultures and religions. Sometimes we have some similarities and sometimes there are differences. It makes visiting a new place even more interesting. What are your traditions?

Korea Town Jongro BBQ

Did you know Manhattan has a Korea Town? Do you know where it is? Which restaurant has decor that makes you feel you are in Korea? Jongro BBQ can transport you to Asia.

Korea Town, also known as K-Town, is south of the Empire State Building. It is on 32nd Street roughly between Broadway and 5th Avenue in Midtown Manhattan. The neighborhood has several restaurants. The first few I walked into that were on street level were packed on a Sunday afternoon. I decided to try Jongro- which was on the second floor of a building at 22 West 32nd Street. I was pleasantly surprised.

The decor of the restaurant brings you to Korea. I lived in Korea for two years and it reminded me of a restaurant in the country we stopped in on the way back from hiking a mountain. Jongro BBQ has antique items from Korea on the walls and on poles. They have old signage, a post box, and a vintage delivery bike to name a few. They also constructed areas of the restaurant to look like architecture you would find in Korea.

Newer signage with some of the architecture indoors
Korean post box- I love post boxes.
Vintage delivery bike

This is a BBQ, so you will find cooker areas on the tables. I am supposed to avoid beef and pork. A lot of items on the menu include those things. However, they did have my old standby, BeBimBop. This dish can be served hot or cold. I like it both ways. They only serve it cold at Jongro. It was excellent. I asked for it with egg on top instead of beef and they obliged. The rest of the dish is vegetables and rice. They had a couple of other items on the menu if you did not want a meat dish.

Bebimbop-This was has fried egg, vegetables, and rice.

If you are visiting Manhattan and want to eat Korean food or something healthy, head to Jongro BBQ. Enjoy the decor while you are there. It is one of the gems of Korea Town.

You can visit there website at: http://www.jongrobbqny.com

Cinco de Mayo at Casa Villa

On St. Patrick’s Day, everyone is Irish for a day. Another ethnic holiday that is starting to be celebrated by many, not just those who are from where it originates, is Cinco de Mayo. At Casa Villa everyone is invited to experience the food and culture of Mexico.

Besides food they have live music, folk dancing, bouncy houses for the kids, and vendors. I was only there for about 40 minutes and it was back to back entertainment.

I was able to see a more contemporary Mexican music group when I arrived.

Then, Folklorica of Poughkeepsie performed four dances from Oaxaca, Mexico. First, a man and a woman performed a dance known as Mixteco.

Mixteco
Dancing the Oaxaca Dance the Mixteca. At this point he had a rose in his mouth.

Next, the Folklorica of Poughkeepsie performed a dance with puppets called Chinas Oaxaquenas.

Chinas Oaxaquenas

A group of girls from the same group then performed a folkloric dance.

Lastly, a dance called El Torito, with a bull puppet, was performed.

El Torito

The food was delicious. They had food and drinks being sold outside, but during the celebrations a limited menu was offered indoors if you preferred less action.

The party started around lunchtime and went into the night. Some stay most of the day, while others stop in for a short visit. Again, I was only there for about 40 minutes. I understand I missed other performances before I arrived and I am sure others went on after I left.

I wish I could have stayed longer. From what I experienced I highly recommend stopping by Casa Villa around Cinco de Mayo. You can experience the food and culture of Mexico.

Check out their Facebook page for more information: https://www.facebook.com/pages/category/Tex-Mex-Restaurant/Casa-Villa-Mexican-Restaurant-1442301769167523/