Paddling Fish Creek Ponds to Other Ponds

The Adirondack Mountains in New York has a lot of places to paddle where you do not have to get out of the water to go from one pond of lake to another. Others lakes or ponds may have cary paths between them. Fish Creek Ponds is another body of water you can access multiple bodies of water through without getting out of your canoe or kayak.

I actually launched from Follensby Clear Pond. The launch is near the Spider Creek Passage into Fish Creek Ponds. I launched from there to get two chances to see the loon baby and its mom. Going through Fish Creek Ponds after you go under the Route 30 bridge you see Fish Creek Ponds Campgrounds along the pond. These are paid sites. I could see a playground, beach, and fishing area.

Square Pond
On Fish Creek Ponds heading towards Square Pond
Square Pond Entrance

From there you can access Square Pond . I went in this body of water a short distance then turned and went towards Fish Creek.

Fish Creek

Fish Creek is a fairly wide creek in most areas. It is like a highway for canoeists and kayakers. Along the way you pass a dock to the canoe carry heading towards Follensby Clear Pond. The dock was too short for my 10 foot kayak to park at and the water next to the dock was too deep for me to step into. It was really more for canoes. This would be another way to get to Follensby Clear Pond avoiding a long paddle through Fish Creek Ponds, Spider Creek Passage and into Follensby Clear Pond.

Under this camp ground road leads into Fish Creek.
Once you went up Fish Creek a short ways, only boats with electric motors under 5 horsepower were allowed. This is great for kayakers and canoeists. It is also good for the wildlife.
Instead of paddling all the way back to Follensby Clear Pond from there a canoeist could pull up here and carry through a path to the pond. I tried to get out there ,but even on a sit on top kayak it was a no go. The dock was too short and the water right up to the land was too deep. I think it was actually about 2 1/2 to 3 feet deep or more next to the docks. It was all a very short area. I could not get close going head first or backwards to the dock in my over 10 foot kayak.
Copperas Pond
They actually had a sign up where you turn for this pond.

Next up was Copperas Pond. There are two primitive campsites on this body of water. They are across then pond from each other. Each has an open outhouse or privy. Behind the campsite I tied up at you also got a view of a another pond that had no outlet connecting it to other bodies of water.

Looking towards the opposite end of the pond. I saw an eagle flying towards another pond from here. The eagles in the Adirondacks travel from pond to pond or lake to lake.
This was looking towards the exit of Copperas Pond into Fish Creek.
Passage from Fish Creek into Floodwood Pond

Next I started paddling towards a Fish Creek passage that connects to Floodwood Pond and eventually Rollins Pond. Little Square Pond is beyond the entrance to this passage. It is unnamed on maps, but it may still be considered Fish Creek. At the entrance there was another primitive campsite. Floodwood Pond has several primitive campsites along it.

The water here was shallow.

I turned back before Floodwood as I had already paddled quite a ways from Follensby Clear Pond. I will save Floodwood and Rollins for another trip.

Wildlife
This was a long Fish Creek heading back. This is a beaver lodge. Beavers abound in the Adirondacks, but it appears this one, if still active does not dam the bodies of water.

I did see loons along the way. These ponds and creeks had more boat traffic due to the campgrounds on Fish Creek Ponds and Rollins Pond. Most of Fish Creek was not for power boats. Way back on Fish Creek beyond Copperas Pond I saw a loon who was quite busy fishing. I also saw a loon near the campgrounds at Fish Creek Ponds and a mother loon and her baby on the other side of Fish Creek Ponds near the private houses closer to Follensby Clear Pond.

In the summer there is more traffic on these bodies of water than others. It is due to two large campgrounds on Rollins Pond and Fish Creek Ponds. Both of those campgrounds allow caravans/campers. Despite that fact, it is still a nice place to paddle. I want to return to kayak from Rollins Pond to Floodwood Pond.

8 thoughts on “Paddling Fish Creek Ponds to Other Ponds”

  1. What a place!
    You mention the amount of traffic along Spider Creek, maybe due to the campgrounds. I think partially, but Follensby has a history and for most of the 20th century there were 50 or so tent platforms/summer cabins, State sanctioned with rules, situated around its shore. My family owned one and I spent my summers there till I was 13 or so. So, just responding to the idea that it was tourists (I know, you didn’t say that!). There are some deep roots to that area that now appear wild.
    There were overall >400 camps in this program scattered about that area. Much more information here:
    https://localwiki.org/hsl/Platform_Tents

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    1. They are first come first take free campsites these days . I know there was talk of decreasing the number of sites. Not sure if that was done. Thanks for the info. It mostly appears undeveloped around Follensby Clear Pond these days and more wild. I’m surely not an expert on the history. There are many locals in the women’s canoe club I met on that pond. Most of the people I met camping were 30-40 somethings with kids.

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    2. I talked to many people who were visiting the area. Some rented cabins along one of the lakes, some owned cabins near a lake and stay part of the year , others stayed in local hotels or the campgrounds at Rollins Pond or Fish Creek Ponds. Some stayed in the free campsites along the various ponds and lakes. Most people I met were from out of the area and no one mentioned this , so I am not sure they have any ties to the history that you mention.

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    1. Did not have time to go up and and see it on its own. They are up there until the lake freezes. They leave before too. They have tracked a few with a transmitter. One ended up wintering in southern NJ on the coast. Two there ended up in the Long Island Sound. The adults power through and make the flight without stopping. The young fliers zig zag and make pit stops on different lakes try to figure out where they should end up. I participated in a zoom meeting with a loon expert.

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